(CNN)Ninety-one thousand.

Ninety-one thousand lives snatched by an unrelenting pandemic since the first state in the US reopened on April 24.
Ninety-one thousand whose dreams were cut short, plans ended prematurely.
Each one a son or daughter. Someone’s uncle. A best friend. A person who left others to grieve, cry and try to carry on.
Here are some of their stories:
Noe Martinez Domingues loved knowing how things worked.

His family moved to Dallas, Texas, from Mexico in 1990. To make ends meet, his daughter, Bethzabet Martinez Amador, says her father worked in several kitchens throughout the city, washing dishes or waiting tables. Then one day Domingues decided to do a home course in auto mechanics.
“I remember walking into our living room one morning and seeing my dad kneeling in front of an entire car motor,” Amador told CNN. “He had a small hydraulic floor crane that he had used to hang the motor. Needless to say, my mom was livid at him for bringing all of his tools into the house.”
Domingues sat Amador and her brothers down and explained how the motor worked — how each part contributed to this piece of machinery and made it whole.
Later, he made the siblings a go-kart out of an old lawn mower. By the time he completed his auto course, he had become well-known as the neighborhood mechanic.
As Amador grew up, the family spread out: Domingues in Nashville, Tennessee; Amador in Alexandria, Virginia; her brothers Kevin in California, and Jack in Tijuana, Mexico.
In March 2020 they reunited as a family — the first time in 22 years the three siblings and their dad had been in the same room. It would be the last time they’d see him in person.
Amador says her dad taught them to “work hard, to be honest and to have faith that no matter how bad life seems, one must continue on.”
“I miss my dad every day, and I’ll miss him now until my last dying breath.”

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